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#21 Anderson

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Posted 25 November 2007 - 05:02 PM

what do you mean by historical stuff?

The met has all these greek and roman sculptures and stuff along with a full Egyptian temple. They also have lots of canvas paintings from different periods. Its modeled on the British museum if you've been there

The Museum of Natural History has cultural artifacts from different societies all over the world, and alot of dead animals. Its actually a very awesome museum and my favorite one in ny, if you're into that. Theres also a hall of human evolution in it if you're feeling blasphemous

foreigners can take a while to get through, I think you have to get fingerprinted and stuff. It shouldnt be so bad, security at heathrow is much more intense than Kennedy airport

avoid all the tourist destinations except the observation deck on the empire state building which is awesome and the lines can be short in the morning

go to chicken guy on 53rd and 6th to meet nyc muslims and eat crappy halal food


I like dead bodies, mummies, war relics, dead stuffed animals etc. Is there halal/kosher everywhere? I only want to be around for around 6-7days. I might take advantage of the weak dollar and buy a laptop and a ipod touch.

we should have a ny/tri state islamican meet up when you come.

it shouldn't be long to get through at Kennedy airport, my cousin came from the UK and he had an Indian passport, it was quick.

you should go to the MET and Natural History Museum, lots of cool old stuff to see there. the MET is huge and it's free. Hopefully the Islamic art section will reopen by then. Typical tourist spots are Times Square (brand name stores, overpriced Madame Tussauds there but the London one is better), Empire State, Statue of Liberty, Central Park, and those open red tourist buses that take you overwhere in the city. There's Chinatown but I don't know how different it is from the London one. (I've heard ours is better. Tai Pan bakery on Mott St. is the best if you have a sweet tooth).

You must have a slice of ny pizza. and the chicken guy is a local favorite for guys.


Thanks- I hate Tussauds and Chinese people but the MET sounds cool. I'd like to see some crack addicts aswell but from a safe distance maybe a tour bus would be good for that.

And an Islamica meet up sounds awesome especially since gotfive is in chicago :flower: and I don't currently have any outstanding threats from any NYC islamicans.
Cheesecake and webcams.

#22 Revert

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Posted 25 November 2007 - 05:05 PM

I like dead bodies, mummies, war relics, dead stuffed animals etc. Is there halal/kosher everywhere? I only want to be around for around 6-7days. I might take advantage of the weak dollar and buy a laptop and a ipod touch.



Thanks- I hate Tussauds and Chinese people but the MET sounds cool. I'd like to see some crack addicts aswell but from a safe distance maybe a tour bus would be good for that.

And an Islamica meet up sounds awesome especially since gotfive is in chicago :flower: and I don't currently have any outstanding threats from any NYC islamicans.


If I can get time off work i'd be up for a meet with fellow Midlander!

In that case, you should get on your knees and thank my Scandinavian ancestors cuz all yr asweomess r belong 2 VIKING rape babies


#23 psychoteddybear

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Posted 25 November 2007 - 05:11 PM

there's halal carts all over the city and a bunch of a restaurants that offer halal food..so no worries there dude.

free stuff all over...

FreeNYCâ„¢ - NYC's Premier Guide to Quality Free and Cheap Events

New York City Free Events, Free Things to Do: free Culture & free Entertainment in NYC, NY, free & inexpensive stuff to do

NYC Free Activities, Amusements and Events in New York City
"God will never change the condition of a people until they change that which is within themselves."
The Holy Quran, 13:11

The Prophet Muhammad (pbuh) said: "Religion is very easy, and whoever overburdens himself in his religion will not be able to continue in that way. So you should not be extremists, but try to be near to perfection and receive the good tidings that you will be rewarded."

Sahih Al-Bukhari, Volume 1, Hadith 38

#24 Revert

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Posted 25 November 2007 - 05:14 PM

there's halal carts all over the city and a bunch of a restaurants that offer halal food..so no worries there dude.

free stuff all over...

FreeNYCâ„¢ - NYC's Premier Guide to Quality Free and Cheap Events

New York City Free Events, Free Things to Do: free Culture & free Entertainment in NYC, NY, free & inexpensive stuff to do

NYC Free Activities, Amusements and Events in New York City


THe wifey and I thinking of hitting up NYC...can you name any good Halal places or stands to eat at?

In that case, you should get on your knees and thank my Scandinavian ancestors cuz all yr asweomess r belong 2 VIKING rape babies


#25 psychoteddybear

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Posted 25 November 2007 - 05:45 PM

THe wifey and I thinking of hitting up NYC...can you name any good Halal places or stands to eat at?


OMG take the 7 train from Port Authority and go to Jackson Heights...I think the stop is 72nd or 76th Avenue? And the restaurant is here: 3703 74th Street,Jackson Heights,NY,11372-6337 - Google Maps

They had this AWESOME buffet that was like 7 or 8 dollars at the most...fresh biryani, the best butter chicken curry I've had so far in the area, and tons of other side dishes...well worth it!

Around that area is a bunch of halal stuff, that I haven't tried, but I was extremely satisfied with this place...

Other than that...well, most halal carts are ok, but one really good one I've found is the one on the corner of 52nd or 53rd and 6th avenue..near the Hilton Hotel.

There's Mamoun's on McDougal (you can take the A C or E, F, etc there to the West 4th Street stop) and they have seriously the best falafel in NYC...no joke, I don't eat falafel anywhere else but there.

Sahara on West 39th and 6th or 7th is pretty good...Turkish/Middle Eastern halal food...

There's a place called Kashmir on West 39th and 8th, but I'd go there for a quick bite really...they've got a buffet lunch which I went to once but wasn't really impressed by...

Khyber Pass on St. Mark's Place has awesome Afghani food too...although it'll run you 20-30 bucks for lunch and perhaps a bit more than that for dinner...you can take the 6 train to Astor Place to get there and then walk 2-3 blocks towards First Avenue to get to it...

Mariachi and Al-Bustan on the below website are expensive as heck...sorry but I'd never pay $10 for a burrito! I went to Al-Bustan once for my birthday and we paid $50 for dinner between the two of us (ironically, it was a former Jewish girl friend who took me there, which was cute of her :lol: )

Other than that...don't know much else. :p I have given you the places I've tried and liked, and I am SUPER picky about food :monkey: The best Indian place though? That one in Queens...totally go for it! :flower:

Good luck and have fun! wa salam

zabihah.com - your guide to halal eating
"God will never change the condition of a people until they change that which is within themselves."
The Holy Quran, 13:11

The Prophet Muhammad (pbuh) said: "Religion is very easy, and whoever overburdens himself in his religion will not be able to continue in that way. So you should not be extremists, but try to be near to perfection and receive the good tidings that you will be rewarded."

Sahih Al-Bukhari, Volume 1, Hadith 38

#26 sixpakistan

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Posted 25 November 2007 - 05:47 PM

what sucks about new york:

- overpriced
- crowded
- elected rudy giuliani as a mayor
- most of the people in it talk like retards
- its full of visible jews
- everyone in it somehow has the idea that they're cool because they live there, even though they're mostly either guidos who can't speak english or annoying pansy yuppie douchebags. or jews.
- it's not chicago

when are you gonna be there, shaf?

#27 psychoteddybear

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Posted 25 November 2007 - 05:52 PM

what sucks about new york:

- overpriced
- crowded
- elected rudy giuliani as a mayor
- most of the people in it talk like retards
- its full of visible jews
- everyone in it somehow has the idea that they're cool because they live there, even though they're mostly either guidos who can't speak english or annoying pansy yuppie douchebags. or jews.
- it's not chicago

when are you gonna be there, shaf?


chicago ain't all that either... and guiliani, as annoying as he is, did a lot of good things for NYC...albeit a lot of bad too but wutever...
"God will never change the condition of a people until they change that which is within themselves."
The Holy Quran, 13:11

The Prophet Muhammad (pbuh) said: "Religion is very easy, and whoever overburdens himself in his religion will not be able to continue in that way. So you should not be extremists, but try to be near to perfection and receive the good tidings that you will be rewarded."

Sahih Al-Bukhari, Volume 1, Hadith 38

#28 tinkerbell

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Posted 25 November 2007 - 06:09 PM

there was a hebrew national hot dog stand in manhattan...


beggar: you know what's the best nation in the world?
my brother: no, what? :confused:
beggar: donation, :) can i have so money?
my brother: :lol: i dont have any :look:

lol.

something you forgot


#29 Anderson

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Posted 25 November 2007 - 06:13 PM

when are you gonna be there, shaf?


I've spent my last three birthdays on three different continents, I want to make it four in four by going there around my birthday next year, so mid-July..ish. Obviously its more expensive than Egypt of the Far East so can only stick around for a little while.

Revert- man that would be awesome, when are you in England btw?
Cheesecake and webcams.

#30 MoonStar

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Posted 25 November 2007 - 06:52 PM

THe wifey and I thinking of hitting up NYC...can you name any good Halal places or stands to eat at?


Halal Bakery and Pizza on 8th Ave and 36st, it's on the corner right by Penn Station and they have awesome turkey/roast beef/pastrami subs.

#31 Revert

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Posted 25 November 2007 - 09:33 PM

I've spent my last three birthdays on three different continents, I want to make it four in four by going there around my birthday next year, so mid-July..ish. Obviously its more expensive than Egypt of the Far East so can only stick around for a little while.

Revert- man that would be awesome, when are you in England btw?


I dunno when i'm gonna be back home again but I live like 20 minutes from the City so if you go, i'll totally come along and meet up!


Thanks for all the advice people i'll save this page and hit up the places you suggested.

In that case, you should get on your knees and thank my Scandinavian ancestors cuz all yr asweomess r belong 2 VIKING rape babies


#32 Revert

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Posted 25 November 2007 - 09:35 PM

what sucks about new york:

- overpriced
- crowded
- elected rudy giuliani as a mayor
- most of the people in it talk like retards
- its full of visible jews
- everyone in it somehow has the idea that they're cool because they live there, even though they're mostly either guidos who can't speak english or annoying pansy yuppie douchebags. or jews.
- it's not chicago

when are you gonna be there, shaf?


I gotta spread the rep..too funny!

In that case, you should get on your knees and thank my Scandinavian ancestors cuz all yr asweomess r belong 2 VIKING rape babies


#33 marjanih

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Posted 26 November 2007 - 12:20 AM

Max Brenner

It was good, hit it up the last time I was in the city. :p

:p
shadha-

#34 MoonStar

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Posted 09 January 2008 - 03:52 PM

Does anyone know if that new Al Rehab ittar store on Atlantic Ave in brooklyn opened up yet?

#35 ABCDGIRL

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Posted 08 February 2008 - 11:13 AM

Anyone going to Ilmfest??????? Im going iA :D
You will not enter paradise until you believe, and you will not believe until you love one another. Let me guide you to something in the doing of which you will love one another. Give a greeting to everyone among you." -- Prophet Muhammad (SAW)

#36 MoonStar

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Posted 06 April 2008 - 09:20 PM

Art Review | 'Re-Orientations'
When the Islamic World Was Inspired by the West
Slide show:
http://www.nytimes.c...ign/28isla.html

Posted Image

Sometimes in the history of art everything seems to be happening everywhere, all at once. The 16th century was like that. It was a grand global burst of lights. The Ming dynasty in China; the Renaissance in Europe; Islamic empires in India, Iran and Turkey were all burning at high incandescence. Visitors traveled from one to another, buying, selling, making plans, taking notes, amazed.

Then, as also happens, there were slowdowns; dimmings, even blackouts here and there. Such shifts in energy form the background to “Re-Orientations: Islamic Art and the West in the 18th and 19th Centuries,” a superb small scholarly show, one as revealing of the past as it is germane to the present, at the Bertha and Karl Leubsdorf Art Gallery at Hunter College.

The show is notable for several reasons. First, it tackles a little-studied subject. We’ve had major exhibitions on the influence of Islamic culture on Europe. We’ve had relatively few that trace influence the other way, Occident to Orient. (“Royal Persian Painting: the Qajar Epoch, 1785-1925” at the Brooklyn Museum a decade ago was a stellar exception.)

Possibly because “Occidentalized” sounds unexotic, 18th- and 19th-century Islamic art has been largely ignored. Few of the 30 small decorative objects at Hunter have been exhibited before, though all are from the collection of a major museum.

Which brings us to another — some might say the primary — attraction of the show. The owning institution is the Metropolitan Museum, where the Islamic galleries are closed for renovation. This Hunter show, unassuming as it is, is by default the largest display of the Met’s Islamic collection in the city.

“Re-Orientations” is actually the offshoot of a larger project: a yearlong seminar led by Ulku U. Bates, professor of Islamic art at Hunter, using material in the Met holdings to examine the early effects of Western modernism on Islamic cultures, its impact kicking in at different times in different places.

Western art styles were current in the Mughal court of India in the 16th century, through the circulation of European prints brought by Christian missionaries. Similar influences took root in Iran. A late-17th-century lacquered pen box, the show’s earliest piece, is painted with Persian roses on the outside and a European-style landscape under the lid. And by this time Ottoman Turkey had also come under the aggressive spell of Western culture.

The Ottoman empire was a superpower, controlling world trade, claiming European land as its own, and as late as 1683, sending an army to the very gates of Vienna. Europe, meanwhile, though nervous, was not passive. In the fields of science, economics and industry, it was surging ahead, becoming modern, while Islamic powers were falling behind.

Among other things, the ancient machinery of Islamic imperial government had become a lead weight. Secular and religious impulses were in stalemate. By comparison Europe was light on its feet, adaptable to quick, opportunistic change. Gradually, through a combination of dazzle and muscle, it gained the upper hand, and then pressed down hard, and kept pressing down, with a demeaning colonial force that remains a bitter memory in the Islamic world.

On the positive side, though, there was the refreshment of aesthetic exchange. Europeans were hungry for Islamic objects and styles. Islamic cultures welcomed input from Europe. The lure of exoticism pulled in both directions.

This is immediately evident in the adoption of oil painting, a European invention, by Islamic artists. Qajar court painters of Persia made spectacular use of it in life-size royal portraits. The sloe-eyed, androgynous youth holding a wine glass in a painting in the show may or may not be royalty, but he is a fine example of a Qajar type.

Islamic artists borrowed themes and styles in addition to Western art mediums. The flowers and birds on a double-page 19th-century album cover from India are Islamic in their patterning, European in their naturalism. A cobalt-blue cut-glass beaker was probably exported from Europe to Iran, then customized on arrival with the addition of a calligraphic inscription in gold.

An elaborate Qajar miniature, one in quasi-Baroque style, of Abraham sacrificing Isaac would appear to be geared to a Western market, but not necessarily. This biblical episode depicted is also in the Koran. In a 19th-century Qajar album painting of two lovers in a landscape, the figure of the reclining woman, her body exposed, may well derive from a Western image — possibly photographic — of a Persian odalisque, here recast for Persian eyes. Orientalism meets Occidentalism, in twisty ways.

Most of the show is about exactly such blending. And even when the objects are less than spectacular — Hunter could borrow only modest items, nothing requiring special climate control or heavy insurance — they are rich with information. And it is information of continuing pertinence. The tensions that modernism produced in the Islamic world — between tradition and innovation, sacred and profane — have been pushed to the point of explosion by the aggressive marketing of Western values globally in the present. Seen in that perspective, every object in the show seems to tick with a volatile history.

The lineaments of that history are laid out in superb essays by Ms. Bates and Stefano Carboni, curator of Islamic art at the Met, in a catalog that makes a signal contribution to the field of Islamic studies and enhanced by contributions from the 15 students from Hunter College and the Graduate Center of the City University of New York who worked on the project.

Three of them — Mitra M. Abbaspour, Stéphanie Fabre and Karen Zonis — are doctoral candidates. I will be on the lookout for their names in future projects. If they take this quiet but intensely charged show as a template, and Ms. Bates as a scholarly model, they can only do brilliantly.

“Re-Orientations: Islamic Art and the West in the 18th and 19th Centuries” is at the Bertha and Karl Leubsdorf Art Gallery at Hunter College, 68th Street and Lexington Avenue, through April 26. (212) 772-4991, hunter.cuny.edu.

#37 MoonStar

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Posted 11 April 2008 - 08:53 PM

https://www.nyhistor...etail&id=629607

ALLURE OF THE EAST: ORIENTALISM IN NEW YORK, 1850–1930

Prelude to Woven Splendor from Timbuktu to Tibet: Exotic Rugs and Textiles from New York Collectors.

To provide a historical context for the upcoming exhibition on oriental rugs of the Hajji Baba club, the Historical Society is organizing a multi-faceted installation examining the fashion for Orientalism in New York during the late 19th century. Through paintings, prints, photographs and books as well as silver, lighting, and metalwork, the display will explore New Yorkers' fascination with the "Orient"-defined for this purpose as the Middle East, as well as North Africa and Moorish Spain. The installation will include paintings of Orientalist artists that hung in New York salons, including Jean-Léon Gérôme, Edwin L. Weeks, and Ernst Koerner, as well as depictions of New Yorkers sporting traditional Middle Eastern dress, including the dramatic portrait of Orientalist William C. Prime in Arab costume and the group portrait of the exotically-attired Gerard Stuyvesant family. By the 1860s, New Yorkers were also incorporating facets of Eastern design, as well as a plethora of imported exotic objects, in domestic interiors influenced by Islamic art and also by impressions of an alluring and sensuous Orient gained from popular translations of works such as The Arabian Nights. Photographs of New York interiors, from George Kemp's Fifth Avenue mansion and Louis C. Tiffany's personal Studio to the Moorish Ottendorfer pavilion on Riverside Drive, will reveal the opulent luxury of these interiors. In addition, the installation will include decorative arts inspired by the East, including Islamic-style silver made by Tiffany & Co. and Moorish-style chandeliers and lighting from Tiffany Studios.

#38 zeyneddine

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Posted 11 April 2008 - 09:22 PM

Syphilis Cases on the Increase in New York City
http://www.nytimes.c...12syphilis.html

It was a scourge of centuries past, a disease that ravaged the body and brain, drove geniuses to madness and slowly brought its victims to a terrible death.

But syphilis, a sexually transmitted disease that was so rare by 1998 that federal health officials had planned to declare it eliminated by 2005, has made a troubling comeback in New York City and across the nation. In the first three months of this year, more than twice as many syphilis cases were diagnosed than were in the first quarter of 2006, according to the city Department of Health and Mental Hygiene.

In recent years, the disease has been most common in men who have sex with men. But now, health officials say they are concerned about an increase in cases among women in New York, following a trend seen nationally beginning in 2005. After a decade with almost no female cases, health officials said the jump among women was possibly fueled by an increase in the number of men having sex with both men and women.

City health officials said they were receiving more reports of bisexual behavior among men. And Dr. Stuart Berman, an epidemiologist at the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, said that in the last few years, New York men with syphilis had reported engaging in bisexual behavior more often than men with the disease in other cities.

Syphilis is highly contagious and can be hard to detect, but is easily curable with antibiotics. Untreated in pregnant women, it can cause stillbirth, severe birth defects and infant death.

The raw numbers are relatively modest — 260 cases in New York for the first quarter of 2007, including 10 among women — but they also contain a troubling signal: risky behaviors and unsafe sex appear to be on the rise. And many health experts warned that a spike in H.I.V. cases could come on the heels of the syphilis outbreak.

“There is risk going on out there,” said Perry N. Halkitis, a professor of applied psychology at New York University who is studying the connection between the use of highly addictive drugs like methamphetamine and unsafe sex. “Most certainly you are going to see an increase in H.I.V. transmission.”

Federal health officials estimate that those infected with syphilis are two to five times more likely to become infected with H.I.V., the virus that causes AIDS, because of the open sores caused by syphilis. But doctors said that because syphilis was on the decline until recently — medical providers do not routinely screen for it except in pregnant women — many people do not suspect the sores are a sign of infection.

There is debate over when syphilis, caused by the bacterium Treponema pallidum, first appeared, but historians said it became a global plague in the 16th century. It was called “the great pox,” to distinguish it from smallpox and because of the large, blistered rashes that occur in the late stages.

A pantheon of historic figures and artists, including Al Capone, Manet and Toulouse-Lautrec, are believed to have died of syphilis, and some historians have suspected that others, including Hitler and Lenin, suffered from undiagnosed cases of the disease.

Syphilis cases significantly declined with the advent of penicillin during World War II.

The disease can look and feel like so many other ailments that it is also known as “the great imitator.” In the final stage, as long as 30 years after initial infection, it can cause severe damage to many internal organs, depression, blindness and fits of creativity, and ultimately, death.

It can easily be spread through oral sex, unlike some other sexually transmitted diseases, and is passed through direct contact with a syphilis sore. Symptoms occur an average of 21 days after infection, according to federal health officials, but they can take as long as 90 days to appear.

The first sign is often a small, firm and round lesion at the point of the body where the disease was contracted. The lesion is painless and will heal without treatment, so many people are not aware they are infected.

In 2005, the last year for which comparable federal data was available, the city’s syphilis rate, 7.7 instances per 100,000 people, was more than double the national average of 3.0 per 100,000.

Federal and local health officials said the rising rates of infection could be attributed to several factors: substance abuse that leads to increased sexual activity and unsafe sex; unsafe sex among people already infected with H.I.V.; complacency about the risks of H.I.V. infection and what some call “condom fatigue,” as the vigilance that surrounded the early days of the AIDS epidemic has faded; and less fear of H.I.V. infection as the progress in treatment for AIDS means that a diagnosis is often no longer a death sentence.

The last time city health officials reported a significant syphilis outbreak, in the 1990s, it was linked to unsafe sex that accompanied the crack epidemic. That outbreak was concentrated largely in poor neighborhoods outside Manhattan, whereas the current one is centered in Manhattan, with infected men living in Chelsea accounting for a majority of the cases.

Blacks and Hispanics accounted for most new cases of syphilis, according to the city’s recent survey, but whites experienced faster rates of increase. The 2007 numbers showed the incidence among white men was three times the incidence during the same period in 2006.

A prominent theory nationally is that the methamphetamine epidemic has given rise to the syphilis comeback — and the greater risk for H.I.V. infection — because the highly addictive drug can cause hypersexuality, leading users to have frequent sex with multiple partners, often without taking precautions.

Susan Blank, New York City’s commissioner for sexually transmitted disease prevention and control, said the department had no data to prove that crystal methamphetamine addiction was responsible for higher syphilis rates.

But Professor Halkitis, who is writing a book about methamphetamine, said drug abuse in New York was unquestionably driving rising rates of sexually transmitted diseases.

Dr. Blank said the health department was alerting New Yorkers and their health care providers about the importance of screening for syphilis, offering free and confidential testing at all of its public clinics.

The increase in cases among women also highlights the need to learn the sexual history of partners, health officials say, as some women may not know that their partners have had sex with men.

The department launched a campaign in February to distribute millions of free condoms, and for those with a syphilis infection, it will confidentially notify sexual partners.


lol
this deserved a post why? :brother:
what a moron :brother:
my sig got stolen :cry:

#39 wheelworks

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Posted 12 April 2008 - 07:28 AM

What's the tallest tower in NYC?

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#40 comportment

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Posted 02 June 2008 - 03:06 PM

NYers are tough. This thread will live on. :flower:

*revives*
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“The unreal is more powerful than the real, because nothing is as perfect as you can imagine it. because its only intangible ideas, concepts, beliefs, fantasies that last. stone crumbles. wood rots. people, well, they die. but things as fragile as a thought, a dream, a legend, they can go on and on.” Chuck Palahniuk




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